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Tuesday September 29, 2020
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM    Life on the Path: Spiritual Development in Adult Life - Life on the Path - Spiritual Development in Adult Life
This course will present some conceptions of spiritual experience and development, including an introduction to ideas from Rudolf Otto, Paul Tillich, Mircea Eliade, Viktor Frankl, and others. Participants will be invited to identify experiences in their lives they see as spiritual, describe them in discussion or in writing, and consider ways they might further pursue these spiritual moments.
 
1:30 PM - 3:30 PM    The Politics of Social Movements - Limit 25 Members - The Politics of Social Movements
This course will explore the nature of social movements in the U.S. and abroad, looking first at social and political theories that account for social movements, then at the various stages of movements, and finally consider a number of concrete social movements, as well as considering failed social movements. We will likely include the various waves of Christian Right, feminist, and civil rights movements in the U.S., including the most recent Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement. We may also consider the anti-war movement, and the Tea Party movement, depending on interest. We will also consider failed social movements, such as that for gun control.
 
Wednesday September 30, 2020
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM    Where Do Babies Come From? - Where Do Babies Come From?
Making babies has been well understood for a long time...that's never been a problem. The problem is understanding how it all works. As so often, the Greeks seem to have been the first to wonder, to observe systematically, and to write about what they found. We'll begin with Aristotle's De Generationem Animalium, but also with Xenephon's little books on hunting and horses. Yet it isn't until 23 centuries later that anybody see sperm and egg meet; and it isn't until well into our own lifetimes that there is a persuasive model of how an embryo takes shape. In the meantime, there are wonderful stories to tell and wonderful observations to enjoy.
 
1:30 PM - 3:30 PM    Birds, Bees, and All Those Trees: Maine Poets Write About the Natural World - a 4-week class, Maximum15 Members, - Birds, Bees, and All Those Trees: Maine Poets
Poems, like all writing, provide lenses through which readers can "see" subjects through the eyes of their authors. The concept of lenses will be the major theme of this course. Poets who write about the natural world in Maine may inspire us to see the familiar from a different angle or discover aspects we hadn't thought of before--i.e., to alter our own lenses. All of them will help us understand the natural world more perceptively while coming to appreciate the power of their language. Participants are not expected to be experienced readers of poetry. If you find yourself thinking, "Gee, I hadn't thought of it that way before," the course will have been a success.
 
6:30 PM - 8:00 PM    Veterinary Life Today - Veterinary Life Today
Dr. Mark Hanks, a busy veterinarian, will offer his five-session class on Wednesday evenings.  Lecture#1: The Bond-What is It? Humans and animals have had a synergistic relationship for thousands of years. Cats were considered magical creatures in Ancient Egypt and mummies have been found in burial sites as early as 3,000 BC. There is evidence there was domestication of cats much earlier in the near east at least 7,000 years ago. Dogs were domesticated at least 17,000 years ago and have played a central role in hunting for hunter/gatherer societies. Over time, they have evolved with us. The bond we share is hard wired into humans...today you can see that best in a baby's response to a household pet. Lecture #2: Veterinary Medicine--a brief history. Although the first formal veterinary school was established in France in 1762, the formalized care of animals predates that by thousands of years. Evidence of trephination in a cow has been found from the Neolithic period. Today we have access to technology that rivals human medicine in every way. CT scans, MRI, immunotherapy are all routinely done to help our pets live long, healthy lives. Lecture #3: Technology--because we "can", does it mean we "should?" Ethics of veterinary medicine from a private practitioner. The access to advanced medical procedures has increased dramatically in the past 20 years. With that access comes increased expense and sometimes stress to the animal. Using real live cases from his experience, we will discuss what is at stake. When do we say goodbye? What are the choices and expenses involved in day-to-day veterinary medicine? Lecture #4: Pets and Emotion--Charles Darwin published a book called, "The Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals" in 1872, after his seminal work in "Origin of the Species." It was largely ignored and only recently has been looked at more closely. What is anthropomorphism and is it useful? How has our understanding and research on animal emotion evolved? We will look at some studies of animal emotion and share our own experiences. Lecture #5: Veterinary Medicine--challenges for the future. Veterinarians are in high demand because of the strong bond we have with our pets. In Maine, and nationally, they are in increasingly short supply. In our last lecture, we will look at why suicide rates are increasing among veterinarians, and the change in the business model for veterinary practices. Each practice recreates a small hospital...an in house laboratory, X-ray capability, staff costs, ultrasound, drugs and supplies, oxygen, and a variety of choices of services to provide. The overhead is huge, the costs are rising on both sides of the reception desk. After 31 years of practice, Dr. Hanks will be honest about the challenges., but also the rewards of being a veterinarian.
 
Thursday October 1, 2020
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM    Talking Together about Race and Privilege - 4-week class, Maximum 50 Members - Talking Together about Race and Privilege
This class is a four-session series exploring Race and Privilege--that would be white privilege--in America.Topics to be explored will be: How our conception of ourselves as part of a History, not only as individuals, changes our outlook on accountability, oppression, and privilege. How our country's history is comprised of multiple histories, some highlighted, some suppressed, some whitewashed. How "Racism" and "Privilege" are confusing terms, especially when confounded with class. How black historical experience bleeds into the structural racism in today's U.S. How and why white resistance to Black Lives Matter manifests as it does. The format of the course will be a series of slides each lasting for 5-10 minutes max, each sequence followed by some small group reflection about what's been presented, for a total duration of 1 1/2 hours each of the four sessions.
 
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM    Climate Change Adaption in Maine's Farms and Forests - Climate Change Adaptation in Maine's Farms and Forests
This course will cover known impacts of climate change to agriculture and forestry in Maine, including how land managers are thinking about and dealing with changes, and what members of the public can do to help.Course format will be a combination of lecture and discussion, including guest presentations from UMaine faculty and graduate students doing research at the intersections of climate, agriculture, and forestry.PVSC is happy to have Ruth offer this class, especially since her spring offering was cancelled.
 
Friday October 2, 2020
1:30 PM - 3:30 PM    Poe in the Time of Corona - Maximum 20 Members - Poe in the Time of Corona
Edgar Allan Poe used Gothic sensibilities to deal with the surreal nature of life. We'll look at a handful of his stories, discuss how they can give us insight into dealing with scary times, and have some good laughs along the way. Poe is incredibly funny!
 
Monday October 5, 2020
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM    Experimenting with Watercolor - Maximum 10 Members - Experimenting with Watercolor
This course will provide an introduction to watercolor media and techniques, as students gain experience working with this entertaining and challenging media. Participants will learn about watercolor basics and will practice a variety of techniques. Zoom time will be used for demonstrations and critiques, and participants will have assignments to complete.The first class, which starts on October 5th, will provide an introduction to paints, brushes, and paper, etc. Participants will be given some practice exercises to complete before the second class. Each class period will provide time for questions and comments, critique of finished work, and an introduction to the next project. The hope is that critique, comments, and questions will take about 30-45 minutes, with the remaining time used for participants to work on the assignment for the week.While this is a first time zoom painting class, painting classes have been done via videos and television instruction, so, with flexibility of the instructor and participants, it will be an enjoyable way to block out time for individuals to create projects of watercolor medium.Materials used:Kal will go over materials during the first class, in case members wish to wait before purchasing materials. Items can also be purchased online at Dick Blick, or if you are a beginner, someone you know might lend you the tools you need to get started.General suggestions:   1. A set of watercolor tubes (student grade is a good place to start - not too cheap or   expensive)   2. A few watercolor brushes (soft hair brushes-small, medium, and large)   3. Watercolor paper (pads of 140 lb., and a board to use to support the paper)   4. Palette - larger is more useful than smaller   5. Painter's tape is useful to hold down the paper while you work   6. Container for water, a sponge, paper towels, pencil, eraser, waterproof ink pen, etc.   7. Small bottle of liquid masque (if you wish)   8. Other items will be discussed as the class progresses
 
Tuesday October 6, 2020
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM    Life on the Path: Spiritual Development in Adult Life - Life on the Path - Spiritual Development in Adult Life
This course will present some conceptions of spiritual experience and development, including an introduction to ideas from Rudolf Otto, Paul Tillich, Mircea Eliade, Viktor Frankl, and others. Participants will be invited to identify experiences in their lives they see as spiritual, describe them in discussion or in writing, and consider ways they might further pursue these spiritual moments.
 
1:30 PM - 3:30 PM    The Politics of Social Movements - Limit 25 Members - The Politics of Social Movements
This course will explore the nature of social movements in the U.S. and abroad, looking first at social and political theories that account for social movements, then at the various stages of movements, and finally consider a number of concrete social movements, as well as considering failed social movements. We will likely include the various waves of Christian Right, feminist, and civil rights movements in the U.S., including the most recent Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement. We may also consider the anti-war movement, and the Tea Party movement, depending on interest. We will also consider failed social movements, such as that for gun control.
 
Wednesday October 7, 2020
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM    Where Do Babies Come From? - Where Do Babies Come From?
Making babies has been well understood for a long time...that's never been a problem. The problem is understanding how it all works. As so often, the Greeks seem to have been the first to wonder, to observe systematically, and to write about what they found. We'll begin with Aristotle's De Generationem Animalium, but also with Xenephon's little books on hunting and horses. Yet it isn't until 23 centuries later that anybody see sperm and egg meet; and it isn't until well into our own lifetimes that there is a persuasive model of how an embryo takes shape. In the meantime, there are wonderful stories to tell and wonderful observations to enjoy.
 
1:30 PM - 3:30 PM    Birds, Bees, and All Those Trees: Maine Poets Write About the Natural World - a 4-week class, Maximum15 Members, - Birds, Bees, and All Those Trees: Maine Poets
Poems, like all writing, provide lenses through which readers can "see" subjects through the eyes of their authors. The concept of lenses will be the major theme of this course. Poets who write about the natural world in Maine may inspire us to see the familiar from a different angle or discover aspects we hadn't thought of before--i.e., to alter our own lenses. All of them will help us understand the natural world more perceptively while coming to appreciate the power of their language. Participants are not expected to be experienced readers of poetry. If you find yourself thinking, "Gee, I hadn't thought of it that way before," the course will have been a success.
 
6:30 PM - 8:00 PM    Veterinary Life Today - Veterinary Life Today
Dr. Mark Hanks, a busy veterinarian, will offer his five-session class on Wednesday evenings.  Lecture#1: The Bond-What is It? Humans and animals have had a synergistic relationship for thousands of years. Cats were considered magical creatures in Ancient Egypt and mummies have been found in burial sites as early as 3,000 BC. There is evidence there was domestication of cats much earlier in the near east at least 7,000 years ago. Dogs were domesticated at least 17,000 years ago and have played a central role in hunting for hunter/gatherer societies. Over time, they have evolved with us. The bond we share is hard wired into humans...today you can see that best in a baby's response to a household pet. Lecture #2: Veterinary Medicine--a brief history. Although the first formal veterinary school was established in France in 1762, the formalized care of animals predates that by thousands of years. Evidence of trephination in a cow has been found from the Neolithic period. Today we have access to technology that rivals human medicine in every way. CT scans, MRI, immunotherapy are all routinely done to help our pets live long, healthy lives. Lecture #3: Technology--because we "can", does it mean we "should?" Ethics of veterinary medicine from a private practitioner. The access to advanced medical procedures has increased dramatically in the past 20 years. With that access comes increased expense and sometimes stress to the animal. Using real live cases from his experience, we will discuss what is at stake. When do we say goodbye? What are the choices and expenses involved in day-to-day veterinary medicine? Lecture #4: Pets and Emotion--Charles Darwin published a book called, "The Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals" in 1872, after his seminal work in "Origin of the Species." It was largely ignored and only recently has been looked at more closely. What is anthropomorphism and is it useful? How has our understanding and research on animal emotion evolved? We will look at some studies of animal emotion and share our own experiences. Lecture #5: Veterinary Medicine--challenges for the future. Veterinarians are in high demand because of the strong bond we have with our pets. In Maine, and nationally, they are in increasingly short supply. In our last lecture, we will look at why suicide rates are increasing among veterinarians, and the change in the business model for veterinary practices. Each practice recreates a small hospital...an in house laboratory, X-ray capability, staff costs, ultrasound, drugs and supplies, oxygen, and a variety of choices of services to provide. The overhead is huge, the costs are rising on both sides of the reception desk. After 31 years of practice, Dr. Hanks will be honest about the challenges., but also the rewards of being a veterinarian.
 
Thursday October 8, 2020
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM    Talking Together about Race and Privilege - 4-week class, Maximum 50 Members - Talking Together about Race and Privilege
This class is a four-session series exploring Race and Privilege--that would be white privilege--in America.Topics to be explored will be: How our conception of ourselves as part of a History, not only as individuals, changes our outlook on accountability, oppression, and privilege. How our country's history is comprised of multiple histories, some highlighted, some suppressed, some whitewashed. How "Racism" and "Privilege" are confusing terms, especially when confounded with class. How black historical experience bleeds into the structural racism in today's U.S. How and why white resistance to Black Lives Matter manifests as it does. The format of the course will be a series of slides each lasting for 5-10 minutes max, each sequence followed by some small group reflection about what's been presented, for a total duration of 1 1/2 hours each of the four sessions.
 
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM    Climate Change Adaption in Maine's Farms and Forests - Climate Change Adaptation in Maine's Farms and Forests
This course will cover known impacts of climate change to agriculture and forestry in Maine, including how land managers are thinking about and dealing with changes, and what members of the public can do to help.Course format will be a combination of lecture and discussion, including guest presentations from UMaine faculty and graduate students doing research at the intersections of climate, agriculture, and forestry.PVSC is happy to have Ruth offer this class, especially since her spring offering was cancelled.
 
Friday October 9, 2020
1:30 PM - 3:30 PM    Poe in the Time of Corona - Maximum 20 Members - Poe in the Time of Corona
Edgar Allan Poe used Gothic sensibilities to deal with the surreal nature of life. We'll look at a handful of his stories, discuss how they can give us insight into dealing with scary times, and have some good laughs along the way. Poe is incredibly funny!
 
Monday October 12, 2020
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM    Experimenting with Watercolor - Maximum 10 Members - Experimenting with Watercolor
This course will provide an introduction to watercolor media and techniques, as students gain experience working with this entertaining and challenging media. Participants will learn about watercolor basics and will practice a variety of techniques. Zoom time will be used for demonstrations and critiques, and participants will have assignments to complete.The first class, which starts on October 5th, will provide an introduction to paints, brushes, and paper, etc. Participants will be given some practice exercises to complete before the second class. Each class period will provide time for questions and comments, critique of finished work, and an introduction to the next project. The hope is that critique, comments, and questions will take about 30-45 minutes, with the remaining time used for participants to work on the assignment for the week.While this is a first time zoom painting class, painting classes have been done via videos and television instruction, so, with flexibility of the instructor and participants, it will be an enjoyable way to block out time for individuals to create projects of watercolor medium.Materials used:Kal will go over materials during the first class, in case members wish to wait before purchasing materials. Items can also be purchased online at Dick Blick, or if you are a beginner, someone you know might lend you the tools you need to get started.General suggestions:   1. A set of watercolor tubes (student grade is a good place to start - not too cheap or   expensive)   2. A few watercolor brushes (soft hair brushes-small, medium, and large)   3. Watercolor paper (pads of 140 lb., and a board to use to support the paper)   4. Palette - larger is more useful than smaller   5. Painter's tape is useful to hold down the paper while you work   6. Container for water, a sponge, paper towels, pencil, eraser, waterproof ink pen, etc.   7. Small bottle of liquid masque (if you wish)   8. Other items will be discussed as the class progresses
 
Tuesday October 13, 2020
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM    Life on the Path: Spiritual Development in Adult Life - Life on the Path - Spiritual Development in Adult Life
This course will present some conceptions of spiritual experience and development, including an introduction to ideas from Rudolf Otto, Paul Tillich, Mircea Eliade, Viktor Frankl, and others. Participants will be invited to identify experiences in their lives they see as spiritual, describe them in discussion or in writing, and consider ways they might further pursue these spiritual moments.
 
1:30 PM - 3:30 PM    The Politics of Social Movements - Limit 25 Members - The Politics of Social Movements
This course will explore the nature of social movements in the U.S. and abroad, looking first at social and political theories that account for social movements, then at the various stages of movements, and finally consider a number of concrete social movements, as well as considering failed social movements. We will likely include the various waves of Christian Right, feminist, and civil rights movements in the U.S., including the most recent Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement. We may also consider the anti-war movement, and the Tea Party movement, depending on interest. We will also consider failed social movements, such as that for gun control.
 
Wednesday October 14, 2020
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM    Where Do Babies Come From? - Where Do Babies Come From?
Making babies has been well understood for a long time...that's never been a problem. The problem is understanding how it all works. As so often, the Greeks seem to have been the first to wonder, to observe systematically, and to write about what they found. We'll begin with Aristotle's De Generationem Animalium, but also with Xenephon's little books on hunting and horses. Yet it isn't until 23 centuries later that anybody see sperm and egg meet; and it isn't until well into our own lifetimes that there is a persuasive model of how an embryo takes shape. In the meantime, there are wonderful stories to tell and wonderful observations to enjoy.
 
1:30 PM - 3:30 PM    Birds, Bees, and All Those Trees: Maine Poets Write About the Natural World - a 4-week class, Maximum15 Members, - Birds, Bees, and All Those Trees: Maine Poets
Poems, like all writing, provide lenses through which readers can "see" subjects through the eyes of their authors. The concept of lenses will be the major theme of this course. Poets who write about the natural world in Maine may inspire us to see the familiar from a different angle or discover aspects we hadn't thought of before--i.e., to alter our own lenses. All of them will help us understand the natural world more perceptively while coming to appreciate the power of their language. Participants are not expected to be experienced readers of poetry. If you find yourself thinking, "Gee, I hadn't thought of it that way before," the course will have been a success.
 
6:30 PM - 8:00 PM    Veterinary Life Today - Veterinary Life Today
Dr. Mark Hanks, a busy veterinarian, will offer his five-session class on Wednesday evenings.  Lecture#1: The Bond-What is It? Humans and animals have had a synergistic relationship for thousands of years. Cats were considered magical creatures in Ancient Egypt and mummies have been found in burial sites as early as 3,000 BC. There is evidence there was domestication of cats much earlier in the near east at least 7,000 years ago. Dogs were domesticated at least 17,000 years ago and have played a central role in hunting for hunter/gatherer societies. Over time, they have evolved with us. The bond we share is hard wired into humans...today you can see that best in a baby's response to a household pet. Lecture #2: Veterinary Medicine--a brief history. Although the first formal veterinary school was established in France in 1762, the formalized care of animals predates that by thousands of years. Evidence of trephination in a cow has been found from the Neolithic period. Today we have access to technology that rivals human medicine in every way. CT scans, MRI, immunotherapy are all routinely done to help our pets live long, healthy lives. Lecture #3: Technology--because we "can", does it mean we "should?" Ethics of veterinary medicine from a private practitioner. The access to advanced medical procedures has increased dramatically in the past 20 years. With that access comes increased expense and sometimes stress to the animal. Using real live cases from his experience, we will discuss what is at stake. When do we say goodbye? What are the choices and expenses involved in day-to-day veterinary medicine? Lecture #4: Pets and Emotion--Charles Darwin published a book called, "The Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals" in 1872, after his seminal work in "Origin of the Species." It was largely ignored and only recently has been looked at more closely. What is anthropomorphism and is it useful? How has our understanding and research on animal emotion evolved? We will look at some studies of animal emotion and share our own experiences. Lecture #5: Veterinary Medicine--challenges for the future. Veterinarians are in high demand because of the strong bond we have with our pets. In Maine, and nationally, they are in increasingly short supply. In our last lecture, we will look at why suicide rates are increasing among veterinarians, and the change in the business model for veterinary practices. Each practice recreates a small hospital...an in house laboratory, X-ray capability, staff costs, ultrasound, drugs and supplies, oxygen, and a variety of choices of services to provide. The overhead is huge, the costs are rising on both sides of the reception desk. After 31 years of practice, Dr. Hanks will be honest about the challenges., but also the rewards of being a veterinarian.
 
Thursday October 15, 2020
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM    Talking Together about Race and Privilege - 4-week class, Maximum 50 Members - Talking Together about Race and Privilege
This class is a four-session series exploring Race and Privilege--that would be white privilege--in America.Topics to be explored will be: How our conception of ourselves as part of a History, not only as individuals, changes our outlook on accountability, oppression, and privilege. How our country's history is comprised of multiple histories, some highlighted, some suppressed, some whitewashed. How "Racism" and "Privilege" are confusing terms, especially when confounded with class. How black historical experience bleeds into the structural racism in today's U.S. How and why white resistance to Black Lives Matter manifests as it does. The format of the course will be a series of slides each lasting for 5-10 minutes max, each sequence followed by some small group reflection about what's been presented, for a total duration of 1 1/2 hours each of the four sessions.
 
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM    Climate Change Adaption in Maine's Farms and Forests - Climate Change Adaptation in Maine's Farms and Forests
This course will cover known impacts of climate change to agriculture and forestry in Maine, including how land managers are thinking about and dealing with changes, and what members of the public can do to help.Course format will be a combination of lecture and discussion, including guest presentations from UMaine faculty and graduate students doing research at the intersections of climate, agriculture, and forestry.PVSC is happy to have Ruth offer this class, especially since her spring offering was cancelled.
 
Friday October 16, 2020
1:30 PM - 3:30 PM    Poe in the Time of Corona - Maximum 20 Members - Poe in the Time of Corona
Edgar Allan Poe used Gothic sensibilities to deal with the surreal nature of life. We'll look at a handful of his stories, discuss how they can give us insight into dealing with scary times, and have some good laughs along the way. Poe is incredibly funny!
 
Monday October 19, 2020
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM    Experimenting with Watercolor - Maximum 10 Members - Experimenting with Watercolor
This course will provide an introduction to watercolor media and techniques, as students gain experience working with this entertaining and challenging media. Participants will learn about watercolor basics and will practice a variety of techniques. Zoom time will be used for demonstrations and critiques, and participants will have assignments to complete.The first class, which starts on October 5th, will provide an introduction to paints, brushes, and paper, etc. Participants will be given some practice exercises to complete before the second class. Each class period will provide time for questions and comments, critique of finished work, and an introduction to the next project. The hope is that critique, comments, and questions will take about 30-45 minutes, with the remaining time used for participants to work on the assignment for the week.While this is a first time zoom painting class, painting classes have been done via videos and television instruction, so, with flexibility of the instructor and participants, it will be an enjoyable way to block out time for individuals to create projects of watercolor medium.Materials used:Kal will go over materials during the first class, in case members wish to wait before purchasing materials. Items can also be purchased online at Dick Blick, or if you are a beginner, someone you know might lend you the tools you need to get started.General suggestions:   1. A set of watercolor tubes (student grade is a good place to start - not too cheap or   expensive)   2. A few watercolor brushes (soft hair brushes-small, medium, and large)   3. Watercolor paper (pads of 140 lb., and a board to use to support the paper)   4. Palette - larger is more useful than smaller   5. Painter's tape is useful to hold down the paper while you work   6. Container for water, a sponge, paper towels, pencil, eraser, waterproof ink pen, etc.   7. Small bottle of liquid masque (if you wish)   8. Other items will be discussed as the class progresses
 
Tuesday October 20, 2020
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM    Life on the Path: Spiritual Development in Adult Life - Life on the Path - Spiritual Development in Adult Life
This course will present some conceptions of spiritual experience and development, including an introduction to ideas from Rudolf Otto, Paul Tillich, Mircea Eliade, Viktor Frankl, and others. Participants will be invited to identify experiences in their lives they see as spiritual, describe them in discussion or in writing, and consider ways they might further pursue these spiritual moments.
 
1:30 PM - 3:30 PM    The Politics of Social Movements - Limit 25 Members - The Politics of Social Movements
This course will explore the nature of social movements in the U.S. and abroad, looking first at social and political theories that account for social movements, then at the various stages of movements, and finally consider a number of concrete social movements, as well as considering failed social movements. We will likely include the various waves of Christian Right, feminist, and civil rights movements in the U.S., including the most recent Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement. We may also consider the anti-war movement, and the Tea Party movement, depending on interest. We will also consider failed social movements, such as that for gun control.
 
Wednesday October 21, 2020
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM    Where Do Babies Come From? - Where Do Babies Come From?
Making babies has been well understood for a long time...that's never been a problem. The problem is understanding how it all works. As so often, the Greeks seem to have been the first to wonder, to observe systematically, and to write about what they found. We'll begin with Aristotle's De Generationem Animalium, but also with Xenephon's little books on hunting and horses. Yet it isn't until 23 centuries later that anybody see sperm and egg meet; and it isn't until well into our own lifetimes that there is a persuasive model of how an embryo takes shape. In the meantime, there are wonderful stories to tell and wonderful observations to enjoy.
 
1:30 PM - 3:30 PM    Birds, Bees, and All Those Trees: Maine Poets Write About the Natural World - a 4-week class, Maximum15 Members, - Birds, Bees, and All Those Trees: Maine Poets
Poems, like all writing, provide lenses through which readers can "see" subjects through the eyes of their authors. The concept of lenses will be the major theme of this course. Poets who write about the natural world in Maine may inspire us to see the familiar from a different angle or discover aspects we hadn't thought of before--i.e., to alter our own lenses. All of them will help us understand the natural world more perceptively while coming to appreciate the power of their language. Participants are not expected to be experienced readers of poetry. If you find yourself thinking, "Gee, I hadn't thought of it that way before," the course will have been a success.
 
6:30 PM - 8:00 PM    Veterinary Life Today - Veterinary Life Today
Dr. Mark Hanks, a busy veterinarian, will offer his five-session class on Wednesday evenings.  Lecture#1: The Bond-What is It? Humans and animals have had a synergistic relationship for thousands of years. Cats were considered magical creatures in Ancient Egypt and mummies have been found in burial sites as early as 3,000 BC. There is evidence there was domestication of cats much earlier in the near east at least 7,000 years ago. Dogs were domesticated at least 17,000 years ago and have played a central role in hunting for hunter/gatherer societies. Over time, they have evolved with us. The bond we share is hard wired into humans...today you can see that best in a baby's response to a household pet. Lecture #2: Veterinary Medicine--a brief history. Although the first formal veterinary school was established in France in 1762, the formalized care of animals predates that by thousands of years. Evidence of trephination in a cow has been found from the Neolithic period. Today we have access to technology that rivals human medicine in every way. CT scans, MRI, immunotherapy are all routinely done to help our pets live long, healthy lives. Lecture #3: Technology--because we "can", does it mean we "should?" Ethics of veterinary medicine from a private practitioner. The access to advanced medical procedures has increased dramatically in the past 20 years. With that access comes increased expense and sometimes stress to the animal. Using real live cases from his experience, we will discuss what is at stake. When do we say goodbye? What are the choices and expenses involved in day-to-day veterinary medicine? Lecture #4: Pets and Emotion--Charles Darwin published a book called, "The Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals" in 1872, after his seminal work in "Origin of the Species." It was largely ignored and only recently has been looked at more closely. What is anthropomorphism and is it useful? How has our understanding and research on animal emotion evolved? We will look at some studies of animal emotion and share our own experiences. Lecture #5: Veterinary Medicine--challenges for the future. Veterinarians are in high demand because of the strong bond we have with our pets. In Maine, and nationally, they are in increasingly short supply. In our last lecture, we will look at why suicide rates are increasing among veterinarians, and the change in the business model for veterinary practices. Each practice recreates a small hospital...an in house laboratory, X-ray capability, staff costs, ultrasound, drugs and supplies, oxygen, and a variety of choices of services to provide. The overhead is huge, the costs are rising on both sides of the reception desk. After 31 years of practice, Dr. Hanks will be honest about the challenges., but also the rewards of being a veterinarian.
 
Thursday October 22, 2020
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM    Talking Together about Race and Privilege - 4-week class, Maximum 50 Members - Talking Together about Race and Privilege
This class is a four-session series exploring Race and Privilege--that would be white privilege--in America.Topics to be explored will be: How our conception of ourselves as part of a History, not only as individuals, changes our outlook on accountability, oppression, and privilege. How our country's history is comprised of multiple histories, some highlighted, some suppressed, some whitewashed. How "Racism" and "Privilege" are confusing terms, especially when confounded with class. How black historical experience bleeds into the structural racism in today's U.S. How and why white resistance to Black Lives Matter manifests as it does. The format of the course will be a series of slides each lasting for 5-10 minutes max, each sequence followed by some small group reflection about what's been presented, for a total duration of 1 1/2 hours each of the four sessions.
 
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM    Climate Change Adaption in Maine's Farms and Forests - Climate Change Adaptation in Maine's Farms and Forests
This course will cover known impacts of climate change to agriculture and forestry in Maine, including how land managers are thinking about and dealing with changes, and what members of the public can do to help.Course format will be a combination of lecture and discussion, including guest presentations from UMaine faculty and graduate students doing research at the intersections of climate, agriculture, and forestry.PVSC is happy to have Ruth offer this class, especially since her spring offering was cancelled.
 
Friday October 23, 2020
1:30 PM - 3:30 PM    Poe in the Time of Corona - Maximum 20 Members - Poe in the Time of Corona
Edgar Allan Poe used Gothic sensibilities to deal with the surreal nature of life. We'll look at a handful of his stories, discuss how they can give us insight into dealing with scary times, and have some good laughs along the way. Poe is incredibly funny!